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Holocaust Survivors

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A Trauma-Informed Approach to Aging in Place

A webinar from The Jewish Federations of North America

This webinar looked at how many Holocaust survivors in U.S. Many built new ilves, raised families, and enriched our country. Others struggled to overcome the physical and emotional traumas from previous deprivation. Today most Holocaust survivors are in their 80s and 90s, and one in four lives in poverty. They are at risk for poor physical and mental health and social isolation. For most, the ability to age in place in their own homes and communities is critical because unfamiliar surroundings and constraints on individual choice can trigger traumatic reactions from experiences during the Holocaust. Recognizing that survivors’ needs vary greatly based on different experiences related to concentration camps, living in hiding, or under the constant threat of violence, service providers must display particular care and cultural competency. Participants explored programs helping Holocaust survivors to age in place with dignity, and learn methods that can be applicable to other survivors of persecution. Presenters: Jenni Frumer, CEO, Alpert Jewish Family & Children’s Service of West Palm Beach; Yuliya Gaydayenko, Senior Director of Older Adult Services, Jewish Family Service of Metropolitan Detroit; Shelley Rood, Director, Jewish Federations of North America, Center for Advancing Holocaust Survivor Care. Moderator: John Feather, CEO, Grantmakers In Aging. Thanks to our sponsor, The John A. Hartford Foundation, and our co-sponsors, Jewish Federations of North America, Jewish Family & Children’s Service of West Palm Beach, and Jewish Family Service of Metropolitan Detroit. Webinar date: June 6, 2016. View the recording at https://youtu.be/c4DGCk486GQ.

 

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